Designing Triangle Shawls: Choosing Stitch Patterns

Triangle Shawls are fun to knit! With 4 increases on every right side row a triangle shawl is made of 2 pattern wedges, each of these wedges have increases on either side every 2 rows. A center spine stitch is located in between the wedges and 2-3 edge stitches are worked on each side at the beginning and end of each row.

The basic pattern for this type of shaping involves working a small set of edge stitches (usually 2-3) garter stitches, working a section of the charted wedge shape, working a single center stitch, working a second charted wedge shape and finally working the remaining set of edge stitches.

Because triangle shawls are based on increasing one stitch on each side of each wedge every 2 rows this means that they increase the same number of stitches as the number of rows worked. For example if you are working 8 rows of a wedge shape you are increasing 2 stitches on each side of the right side rows 1, 3, 5, and 7, that means 4 right side rows multiplied by 2 increased stitches each row= 8 stitches. 8 rows and 8 stitches increased.

Choosing stitches for patterning on a triangle shawl follows the same rule, you need a stitch pattern that can create the same number of stitches as the number of rows the pattern takes to complete. By following this math your knitting pattern will have a repeatable chart that can be worked over and over to increase the size of your shawl.

What does this look like?

When looking through a stitch dictionary (or designing your own!) look for the magic ratios of:

Remember: Multiple is the word use to describe how many stitches are in a repeat of the stitch pattern.

Total Rows = Stitch Multiple

Example: 12 rows and 12 stitch multiple

If the number of rows for the pattern EQUALS the number of stitches in the multiple then that pattern will make the number of stitches needed for a new repeat in the two repeats of a triangle shawl chart.

Each side of the chart increases 6 stitches in 12 rows, so you will need 2 repeats of the 12 rows- total 24 rows to increase 12 stitches on each side making room for a full stitch multiple on each side. Each repeat is shown in a red box.

Total Rows = Stitch Multiple x2

Example: 16 rows and 8 stitch multiple

If the number of rows for the pattern IS TWICE the number of stitches in the repeat then that pattern will make the number of stitches needed for a new repeat in the one repeat of a triangle shawl chart.

Each side of the chart increases 12 stitches in 24 rows, so you will need one repeat of the 24 rows to increase 12 stitches on each side making room for a full stitch multiple on each side. Each repeat is shown in a red box.

Total Rows = Stitch Multiple / 2

Example: 6 rows and 12 stitch multiple

If the number of rows for the pattern is HALF the number of stitches in the repeat then that pattern will make the number of stitches needed for a new repeat in four repeats of a triangle shawl chart.

Each side of the chart increases 3 stitches in 6 rows, so you will need 4 repeats of the 6 rows- total 24 rows to increase 12 stitches on each side making room for a full stitch multiple on each side. Each repeat is shown in a red box.

This is a simple way to identify whether a stitch pattern has the right combination of numbers to be worked easily as a triangle shawl.

Remember that you can always insert an additional purl column in to a cable pattern, or maybe add 2 more rows of patterning to your desired stitch pattern to manipulate the numbers and make them easier to create a triangle shawl out of.

Discussion
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24 Responses to “Designing Triangle Shawls: Choosing Stitch Patterns”
    • Julie Schafer
      Julie Schafer

      Like Deborah I am also a beginner. I would also like a tutorial on how to read a chart. Thank you. First time in the group.

      Reply
      • Customer Service
        Customer Service

        Hi Julie. I have forwarded your comment to the proper department. We value your opinion, and it will help with the development of our online streaming community. We will continue to listen and work hard for your complete satisfaction.
        Jean
        The Knitting Circle Video Membership

        Reply
    • Customer Service
      Customer Service

      Hey Deborah,

      Thank you for your feedback. I have forwarded your comment to the proper department. We value your opinion, and it will help with the development of our online streaming community. We will continue to listen and work hard for your complete satisfaction.

      Sincerely,
      Danesha
      The Knitting Circle Video Membership

      Reply
  1. Margie
    Margie

    I have knitted paterened afghans years ago but I hate to say that this pattern left me dumbfounded. I suppose I need to be “walkedthrough” it with words and pictures. Also it would be neat to see the shawl on a model.

    Reply
  2. Margaret I Turner
    Margaret I Turner

    I’m with the others who request a video…so much easier to follow than printed but still the pattern is good to have in addition to the video. Thanks.

    Reply
  3. INGRID FARNHAM
    INGRID FARNHAM

    I’m a beginner and have never knitted a shawl. A video would be very helpful! Thank you!

    Reply
    • Toby
      Toby

      I’m like many others responding, I am very visual but totally confused by the verbiage and the chart

      Reply
      • Customer Service
        Customer Service

        Hi Toby. I have forwarded your comment to the proper department. We value your opinion, and it will help with the development of our online streaming community. We will continue to listen and work hard for your complete satisfaction.
        Jean
        The Knitting Circle Video Membership

        Reply
  4. Carolyn
    Carolyn

    I’m having difficulty understanding your charts. Could you supply a legend of the stitches used?

    Reply
    • Customer Service
      Customer Service

      Hi Carolyn. The circle is a yarn over. The left-leaning slant is ssk (slip, slip, knit) and the right-leaning slant is k2tog (knit two stitches together).
      Jen
      The Knitting Circle

      Reply
      • Carolyn
        Carolyn

        Thank you. May I ask what are the closed circles? I make shawls for a prayer group and think it would be fun to try these patterns.

        Reply
  5. Christine Ryan
    Christine Ryan

    This is all well and good if you like and can read charts. As I don’t, it would be nice to have the pattern info written out as row by row. The concept is one I would like to try, but need extra information. Thanks.

    Reply
    • Customer Service
      Customer Service

      Hi Christine. I have forwarded your comment to the proper department. We value your opinion, and it will help with the development of our online streaming community. We will continue to listen and work hard for your complete satisfaction.
      Jean
      The Knitting Circle Video Membership

      Reply
  6. Ann
    Ann

    I am dumbfounded as well. I must have some kind of mental block. I have never been able to correctly read a chart and although this shawl pictured is beautiful I’ll never be able to create it without written directions and maybe not even then. Very discouraging.

    Reply
    • Customer Service
      Customer Service

      Hi Ann. I have forwarded your comment to the proper department. We value your opinion, and it will help with the development of our online streaming community. We will continue to listen and work hard for your complete satisfaction.
      Jean
      The Knitting Circle Video Membership

      Reply
  7. Sue
    Sue

    You might as well be speaking a foreign language to me. I am too much of a beginner to figure this out, but I would love to make a triangle shawl. Does it translate to crochet?

    Reply