Log Cabin Squares

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Duration: 15:32

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Log Cabin Squares are commonly found in quilting patterns, but they are also a fun knitting technique. In this video, Michele Lee Bernstein explains how to knit a log cabin square.

Michele begins by explain basic log cabin square construction. They are typically worked in a garter stitch, making it an easy and relaxing project. The squares can be made to any size you like. Michele is making a small square for the video. Using the knitted cast on, she casts on 6 stitches. She knits 11 rows, ending on a Wrong Side row. The key is that she wants the same number of garter ridges on the Right Side of work as the number of stitches she has cast on.

Once she has the 6 garter ridges, Michele binds off the stitches using a conventional knitwise bind off. When 1 stitch remains, she leaves this stitch on the needle, but cuts that yarn to weave in the tail later. She turns the square 90-degrees clockwise, and with the new yarn picks up 5 stitches in between each garter ridge. Michele has 6 stitches on the needle once again and knits 11 rows.

On the Right Side, she binds 5 stitches, with 1 stitch remaining. She cuts the yarn, turns the work 90-degrees, and picks up 11 sts along the edge, for a total of 12 stitches on the needle. She knits 11 rows, binds off until 1 stitch remains, turns, and picks up 17 stitches along the next edge, for 18 stitches total on the needle. This process can be repeated for the entire square, always knitting 11 rows, and always having a multiple of 6 stitches on the knitting needle.

Michele notes that no matter how many stitches you cast on you’ll want to have the same number of garter ridges worked in each section. For example, in a worsted weight yarn, Michele likes to begin with 10 stitches and maintain having 10 garter ridges. The stitch count on the needle will always be a multiple of 10.

Finally, Michele shows several examples of ways to work the colors in your log cabin squares and discusses how to assemble them by seaming, if desired. Log cabin squares a fun “potato chip” knitting project to try. You can’t knit just one!